Cong’s J&K doublespeak? Anti-mobile in 2003, for net in 2019

New Delhi, Nov 22 (IANS) In a major embarassment for the Congress, which has been demanding internet connections be restored in Jammu and Kashmir, its leader in the Lok Sabha Adhir Ranjan Chowdhury’s 2003 parliamentary question where he had drawn a connection between terrorism and mobile use in the Kashmir Valley has emerged.In a question, which was answered on December 9, 2003, the Congress leader had asked “Whether a decision of the Union Government to allow limited mobile phone availability in J&K has promoted militant groups as reported in the Statesman dated 2.9.2003?” Chowdhury had another question that read, “If so, whether Jaish-e-Mohammed and other militant groups active in the valley, have established their base through mobile phones?”The opposition party has been consistently raising the issue of restrictions and more recently, internet blockage in the valley, after the Central government abrogated Article 370 of the Constitution that gave special powers to Kashmir, on August 5.With the winter session of Parliament kicking off on November 18, opposition parties led by the Congress, cornered the government on the ongoing internet blockage. Internet has been snapped across the valley ever August 5.In his response on the issue, Home Minister Amit Shah told Parliament that “internet services are very important and is a necessity now, but when it comes to national security, we have to prioritise necessities accordingly”.Replying to a question from senior Congress leader and former J&K Chief Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad, Shah said that internet services were not allowed in the erstwhile Jammu & Kashmir in the past as well, due to security considerations.The BJP, which has found a opportunity to elbow the Congress didn’t lose any time. Its IT Cell chief Amit Malviya told IANS: “Congress has a habit of playing politics over national security. It didn’t bother them back then in 2003. They continue to be equally irresponsible now, in 2019.”–IANSabn/vd

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